Check In To A Masterpiece

The With Art Philadelphia™ Foursquare Program

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Models (Poseuses) by Georges Seurat at the Barnes Foundation.

Models (Poseuses)

Artwork, by Georges Seurat

On view at The Barnes Foundation

Seated Couple by the Dogon peoples at the Barnes Foundation.

Seated Couple

Artwork, by The Dogon peoples

On view at The Barnes Foundation

Supper Time by Horace Pippin at the Barnes Foundation.

Supper Time

Artwork, by Horace Pippin

On view at The Barnes Foundation

Swann Memorial Fountain on Logan Circle.

Swann Memorial Fountain

Artwork, by Alexander Stirling Calder

On view at Logan Circle

Artist in His Museum by Charles Willson Peale at PAFA

Artist in His Museum

Artwork, by Charles Willson Peale

On view at Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

Sunflowers by Vincent van Gogh

Sunflowers

Artwork, by Vincent van Gogh

On view at Philadelphia Museum of Art

Diana

Diana

Artwork, by Augustus Saint-Gaudens

On view at Philadelphia Museum of Art

Gates of Hell at the Rodin Museum

The Gates of Hell

Artwork, by Auguste Rodin

On view at Benjamin Franklin Parkway

On view at Rodin Museum

Description

Anyone who has wished to be inside a Van Gogh painting can now get a bit closer to that dream, thanks to Philadelphia’s new Foursquare program. Through “Check In to a Masterpiece,” experience art in a new way—by virtually checking in at 12 works of art in Philadelphia.

Foursquare users: on foursquare.com/visitphilly, follow the official “Check In to a Masterpiece” list. (If you don’t have Foursquare already, download the mobile app to your phone and then register for an account.) Then use your phone to check in on Foursquare as you explore the works of art on the list. Once you have checked in at a masterpiece, get bragging rights by sharing that moment with your friends. You can “Check In to a Masterpiece” at these 12 artworks of various eras and genres from six Philadelphia cultural institutions.

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2025 Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19130

Models (Poseuses)

While the subject matter — nude models in a studio — is traditional, the pointillist technique Seurat developed to paint Models was, at the time, revolutionary. Seurat first used tiny dots of pure color to compose an image when he painted Sunday in the Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte, which can be seen hanging on the wall in this painting-within-a-painting. Models is considered among the most influential works of modern painting.
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2025 Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19130

Seated Couple

The Barnes Foundation is home to Dr. Albert C. Barnes’ impressive collection of French Impressionist, Post-Impressionist and Early Modern Art, including 181 Renoirs, more than any other collection, and 69 Cezannes, more than in all of France. But it also houses his remarkable collection of African art, like this a wood carving of a couple embracing. Dr. Barnes was committed to showing the influence of African art on western artists, which is still evident in his famous “ensembles”—gallery arrangements that display art from different periods and cultures alongside modern masterpieces.
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2025 Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19130

Supper Time

Born in West Chester, self-taught African-American artist Horace Pippin was known for his brightly colored paintings often made on wood panels. A former student at the Barnes Foundation, Pippin's vibrant works frequently portrayed his memories of childhood and wartime.
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2025 Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19130

The Large Bathers (Les Grandes baigneuses)

Large Bathers is one of three large canvases depicting lounging nudes in a landscape created by Cézanne near the end of his life. His final exploration into the nude, the works are thought to illustrate his desire to connect human oneness with nature. With the bather series critics say Cézanne created some of the most radical, moving works of the 20th-century. You’ll find another of the Large Bathers just down the street at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
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Benjamin Franklin Parkway
between 18th and 20th Streets
Philadelphia, PA

Swann Memorial Fountain

Large Native American figures, a pike, water-spurting frogs and turtles, and, of course, a swan, adorn this fountain that serves as a memorial to Dr. Wilson Cary Swann, founder the Philadelphia Fountain Society. Made in 1924, Alexander Stirling Calder's version of a traditional “river god” sculpture symbolizes the area’s major streams: the Delaware, the Schuylkill, and the Wissahickon. Calder is the son of William Milne Calder, who created the statue of William Penn that sits atop City Hall, and the father of Alexander Calder, whose Ghost mobile dangles inside the Philadelphia Museum of Art at the other end of the Parkway.
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118-128 N. Broad Street
(Broad and Cherry Streets)
Philadelphia, PA 19102

Three Wise Men Greeting Entry Into Lagos

This colorful, large-scale rectangular painting by Kehinde Wiley depicts three young African men standing side-by-side in front of a decorative floral pattern.
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118-128 N. Broad Street
(Broad and Cherry Streets)
Philadelphia, PA 19102

Artist in His Museum

Commissioned by the Peale Museum and painted at age 81, this self-portrait is a celebration of Charles Willson Peale’s career as an artist, naturalist, educator and showman. He painted it to promote his dream to “bring into public view the beauties of nature and art, the rise and progress of the Museum.” Peale is best known for his portraits of soldiers of the American Revolution, including George Washington, and for his role in founding one of the nation’s first museums. Born in Maryland, Peale came to Philadelphia in support of the emerging government and settled in an estate on the campus of La Salle University, which can still be visited today.
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3260 South Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104

Sphinx of Ramses II

This 12-ton Sphinx is the centerpiece in the Penn Museum’s Lower Egyptian Gallery. It was excavated from the sacred enclosure of the temple of the god Ptah at Memphis and inscriptions reveal it originally to have been a representation of the pharaoh we know as Ramses the Great (Ramses II).
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3260 South Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104

Queen Puabi's Headdress and Beaded Cape

Queen Puabi's headdress, beaded cape and jewelry, all ca. 2550 BCE (includes comb, hair rings, wreaths, hair ribbons, and earrings) of gold, lapis lazuli, and carnelian, was excavated in the early 1930s by a joint Penn Museum/British Museum team, at the ancient Mesopotamian Royal Cemetery of Ur, in what is now Iraq.
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2600 Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19130

Sunflowers

This now iconic still life of sunflowers in a simple clay pot is one of four such paintings created by Vincent van Gogh in Arles, France during August and September of 1888. The sunflowers were in bloom and van Gogh painted them each day from morning on, attempting to catch them before they faded. He painted the series to decorate a bedroom for his friend, Paul Gauguin, who would visit him that October.
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2600 Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19130

Diana

Perched atop the staircase in the Great Hall at the Philadelphia Museum of Art is Augustus Saint-Gaudens Diana. Though the graceful, 14-foot statue makes reference to the Roman goddess of the hunt, her athleticism and elongated shape are thoroughly modern. Diana is used to being put on a pedestal, as Saint-Gaudens originally created her as a weathervane for the second Madison Square Garden in New York City. Atop the Stanford White-designed building she towered as the highest point in the city until the structure was demolished in 1925 and she was acquired by the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
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Benjamin Franklin Parkway and 22nd Street Philadelphia, PA 19101

The Gates of Hell

For nearly four decades prior to his death, Rodin worked on this highly detailed sculpture inspired by Dante's Inferno. Originally commissioned for a planned museum in Paris, the Gates inspired some of Rodin's most notable creations, including The Thinker. Located at the entrance to the Rodin Museum, this massive bronze cast is one of two commissioned by Philadelphia theater entrepreneur Jules Mastbaum.
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